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the challenges of the uncertainty they will be facing as soldiers in a counterterrorism environment. it shows this environment they are facing is not precise and orally. the leader they have to be is empfide by the stampede and the circumstances are frequently confusing. the rain is blowing sideways, there is dark and ominous clouds and seems like it's gretting barely brighter as he goes forward. some of the parts of the organization are way ahead and some may or may not catch up. and you have a lightning bolt that is going off that you have to confront. well on behalf of the people up at west point, i want to tell you it's been our pleasure and honor to be able to teach the cadets that are there that are understanding more and more of what they have to confront with regard to terrorism and terrorists and they are up to that task. last summer my son happened to be graduating with the class of 2012. the class of 2012 picked for their class motto for more than ourselves. i think that that reflects the generation of young men and young women that are coming to the military academy at west point
a safer peaceful environment. i wish to you that we have a happy holiday but let's work every sunday and then sunday to send and quest to demilitarize our society and jobs and drugs and guns out and let's choose another way. thank you very much. [applause] >> if we could have your attention for a few minutes. reverend jackson is catching a flight and why he's rushing out so if we could hold your attention for a few moment we would appreciate it. >> mike pappas from the interfaith council is coming to spend a couple moments on the clergy work and then we will close. >> i am in the unenviable position of following a national icon but good people i would indulge you for just a moment to hear a humble message. the theme of today's gathering peace is a prospect that we all pray for -- ah, that was -- but to get there will require the collective participation efforts, resources, and resolve of all in our city by engaging faith leaders to join in the broader effort to end violence in san francisco. mayor lee recognizes a precious resource that could be the effective key to realize our su
and how to give actionable advice requires knowing, and i would argue working in, environments that require close cooperation. that is why our job is not to wait for legal questions to be brought to us or to provide advice on operational decisions after those decisions have been made. our job is to be present at the beginning and throughout the process. just like other senior national security official across the government, the person in my seat, since the creation of nsd, has attended the morning terrorism threat briefing along with the attorney-general and the director of the fbi. just like the analysts and special agents who are working these issues, we aim to stay on top of the threat picture and to help devise tactics and strategies and tools for getting ahead of it. today its standard -- it is standard procedure for agents conducting counterterrorism investigations to consult throughout the process with attorneys and prosecutors in the national security division. that is to ensure that all potential avenues for destruction of a threat, intelligence gathering, investigati
-- the environment is not good for outgoing epa chief lisa jackson. we'll explain. first, uncertain future as well for the next big thing in commercial aviation. what are you doing? nothing. are you stealing our daughter's school supplies and taking them to work? no, i was just looking for my stapler and my... this thing. i save money by using fedex ground and buy my own supplies. that's a great idea. i'm going to go... we got clients in today. [ male announcer ] save on ground shipping at fedex office. ♪ [ male announcer ] some day, your life will flash before your eyes. make it worth watcng. introducing the 2013 lexus ls. an entirely new pursuit. >> bret: wildfires in australia top international news. it's summer down under and fighting fires there are difficult. 95 are burning in new south wales with 18 out of control. new rights for women in saudi arabia. king granted women 30 seats on the top advisory council for the first time. a big step in a country where women's lives are heavily restricted. women are not allowed to travel, work, marry or even be admitted to a public hospital without pe
fourchlg the taliban, to try to reshape the environment there, and to try to maneuver the various players in the region towards negotiated outcome because there was no military outcome. that seems not to have gone well. in the absence of that, what is the strategic course? the strategic course is now to minimize american vulnerability in these areas. not walk afrom afghanistan, as has happened in the past. try to give afghanistan some choices, but for security and to try to get away from what i think is the free riding problem where president obama is free riding on security, and not moving governments forward to get other stake holding in the rest of the country. i think the president has moved that security blanket in part to change the dynamic in the region. he is also committed to rebalancing attention on asia, and he is taking military forces out should they be needed for iran and other matters. this is a very shrewd, smart move that i think the wlous is making. >> now, what we're seeing here, as well, is that they -- we just -- we're told that there's a two-minute warning. they do n
, a has been is missing but with children, have protection concerns in a can't environment or in an urban environment. and so we will look at that population and want to identify those, those people. sometimes people with medical conditions, they can't be treated in a camp. and makes them again more vulnerable and we will look at those populations. so it's kind of a broad array of vulnerabilities that we try to assess. >> ms. strack and, therefore, could you identify, we're talking about those who are eligible for consideration. there has been an identification of an emphasis on those who have participated in assisting the united states efforts either in the military intelligence, otherwise, nongovernment organizations have been put themselves into some peril. what is the distinction between those who are humanitarian versus those who have performed to the benefit of our interests and are therefore being given consideration because of the exposure that may result from that service? >> i would say the programs working in several ways to address both humanitarian concerns and those who work
presentations. we tend to work in rural areas comes i'm happy to hear about urban environment and what's going on. two questions for lives. i have recently chose to the ghostly the ghostly causa schemata was interesting is how communities are popping up across the street. somewhat ironic that are in fact there's no services out there. i'm wondering in the long term from its landing% is, communities, huge communities in areas with little resources, what is the long-term plan for these communities that do also include sort of the dwellers to vent hopes for what they want to be living. that's the first question. to bring services to them for help relocate again and how does that work? the second question -- i was sort of in knowing how you got to where you got to. i feel it in the spaghetti or is so often the government is not interested in addressing because there's so many entrenched and powerful interests. so i'm interested in knowing more about how you saw that movie forward. >> i'll answer your second question first because it's a little easier, which is included around the table with the pe
in the state of the union to work together. we have tried to create an environment where we would be able to work on things that have historically been challenging, but i think we need to do both. >> i think i am out of time. >> we will get the clock fixed. >> thank you for your service, mr. chairman. i want to draw attention to the last time you came before this committee. it was an unusual time were you did not just talk about a balanced budget, but as you referenced, you working with president clinton and this conference -- and this congress produced a balanced budget, something that no other president before or since has done in decades. our republican colleagues, when they took over instead of building on that success, they squandered that success. they never met a tax break that they did not like and they believed in the alchemy that those tax breaks would not for pay for themselves. that in addition to the tax breaks that they advanced, they advanced one increase in spending after another, increasing spending at an incredible rate without wanting to pay for it. after eight years of
assessments that might take against the various environments that the secretary mentioned. and we're engaged -- i've told you, we're engaged in planning to develop options against alternative futures. alternative future one collaboration or permissiveness all of which would have different requirements. >> you talk now possibility of training rebels -- >> i haven't heard that. that's not a request we've head. i don't know if they would have don't that request through some other channel. [inaudible] >> we're not working on options that involve boots on on the ground with, you know, i think you have to keep the possibility that if there is a peaceful transition and international organizations get involved they might ask for tax in that situation. but in a hostile situation, we're not planning for that. >> back to general dempsey, i asked whether there was militarily anything there was the u.s. could do to stop the assad regime from using chemical weapons. >> the act of preventing the use of chemical weapons wash almost unachievable, jennifer, you have to have such clarity of intelligence, you k
, these are women who have either come out of this environment, out of an urban center in particular. we have our own struggles in the rural parts of america. we need to bring these things to the discussion. that is what we need to do. i do not think we will find solutions to the questions that the caller had until we get those people living with the struggles of the table. that means more women, more african-americans, more hispanics, more men and women of color. i feel strongly that we need more women in this discussion. we're still sitting at 20% of congress. we have a long way to go. host: caller in richmond, democrats line. caller: i was wondering how we will ever get equal pay when states like virginia have the right to work law and they can fire you for any reason. and the company i work for, if you discuss what you make to another employee, you can get fired. guest: it is about laws. laws are made by elected officials. who is representing us at the state legislature and in congress matters. we can overturn right to work laws. and we can pass it will pay laws. we need the right people to s
world environment. and the lingering allegations of corruption, nepotism, hangs over his head. >> his brother and father were assassinated, so in some ways he's also trying to stay alive in that country. and facing that possibility, as well. it's been a contentious relationship with karzai over the years. he's had better relationships with some of the generals there like general stanley mcchrystal than he has with others. and i talked with pentagon officials yesterday who were saying they weren't sure how these meetings were going to go because you just never know when you're dealing with president karzai what you're going to get. and in fact i even e-mailed a couple days ago the folks i met in afghanistan during previous trips and they were somewhat concerned, as well, saying they weren't exactly sure what karzai was going to say while he was here with president obama because a lot of people in afghanistan especially some of the leaders there still very much want u.s. troops because they're fully aware that the afghan forces are not going to be ready by the end of next year. >> absol
't need because of the change in the geopolitical environment the stealthy helicopter or the high end artillery. based on what you're seeing in the geopolitical situation, what does that mean future investment. what should be we investing in what should we continue to buy more of? less of. are there vampire programs with using your phraseologies that should be cut? what is the geopolitical environment mean for investment? >> well, again, my friends in the army are mad at me. unfortunately, i think there is here a shift what was the phrase bob used longer, large, basically large prolonged -- [inaudible conversations] >> yeah. that's a good prediction today. who in august of 2001 reconduct -- predicted we would have one in afghanistan? i think it's a dangerous thing in the business. it seems to me to that we needs to strengthen our maritime capability in the western pacific and not to contain china or fight a war with china, god for bid. i think the goal has got to be to try to sustain the peaceful situation, which is only thirty years old. it's the -- we have a huge interest, i think,
afghanistan will have the right environment for conducting elections without interference and without undue concern. we also discussed in a bit of detail and in the environment that we have all aspects of the bilateral security agreement between afghanistan and the united states, and i informed the president that the afghan people already have given their approval to this relationship and value it as one that is good for afghanistan. in that context, the bilateral security agreement is one that the afghan people approve, and i am sure we will conduct it in detail where both the interests of the united states and the interests of afghanistan will be kept in mind. we had a number of other issues also to talk about during our conversations, and perhaps many times in that conversation, beginning with the composition of, of course.-- the conversation, of course. i thanked the president for the help that the united states has given to the afghan people for all that we have gained in the past 10 years and that those gains will be kept by any standard while we're working for peace and stability in
it's had a tremendous year in production, but the political and security environment there remains very challenging. dagen: any other countries, saudi arabia, even the united states with its increasing production here that can make up any loss that we might see in iraq, like is there any cushion anywhere else in the world? >> well, you know, when you look at, you know, where we can see potentially within opec, the saudis are the ones who have their capacity. it becomes an interesting what the saudis will do in terms if we did see losses coming out of iraq. right now we've seen iraqi exports down 10% in december but have not seen a major attack on a facility. for now i think everyone is in sort of wait and see mode. another country you want to watch though is libya. libyan production has been another country that has allowed us to absorb the loss of iranian exports. you do want to watch, do we see any potential problems in libya? that's a country where the security situation does not remain very stable. dagen: thank you. >> thank you for having me. happy new year. connell: let's mov
today it will still be a dangerous environment. we will still need to do force protection, but the mission will change this is how we start to leave and it will happen as of this spring which is a surprise. faster than anybody said it would happen. now, the justification for speeding up the way out, i have to admit, is a little holey. holey with an "e," not ah. this is because of the progress that's been made in terms of after began security forces, capacity to take the lead. i don't really know anything about the strength of afghan security forces and neither do you, unless you are just back from the war, which case, welcome home. but the pentagon's report to congress on that subject which reportedly was ready before the election this year, but did not get released until after the election for some reason, the official u.s. pentagon report on the readiness of afghan security forces, far from afghan security forces ready to take the lead, out of 23 afghan army brigades, only one of those 23 brigades capable of operating independently without support from international or u
be a dangerous environment, that we will still need to do force protection. but the mission is going to change. this is how we start to leave. and it's going to happen as of this spring, which is a surprise, which is faster than anybody said it was going to happen. now, the justification for speeding up the way out, i have to admit, is a little holey, not holy as in ahh. president obama saying the acceleration was possible in part because of what has been made in terms of afghan security forces, their capacity to take the lead. i don't know anything about afghan security forces, and neither do you unless you're newly back from the war, and welcome home, but the pentagon's report on that suggest which was reportedly ready before the election this year, but did not get released until after the election for some reason, the official pentagon support on the readiness of afghan security forces says far from afghan security forces being ready to take the lead, it says out of 23 afghan army brigades, only one of those 23 brigades is capable of operating independently without support from internationa
they're low you're comparing them to a pristine environment that was the wilderness but the level you're finding are lower than what we would find in most cities. >> right now, well these are wilderness lakes we should say. these lakes are anywhere from 30 kilometers or sorry, 60 miles to 60 miles away from the major source. you have to fly into the lakes typically with a helicopter or something. they're not right no the oil sand operation. what is i think important to say, if you look at our most polluted site, which is about 15 miles let's say approximately from the major operation, if you look at that, that current levels would find in a city. what is different in many cities and many areas, these pollutants, specific ones we're looking at here, hydrocarbons are decreasing. what we're seeing they're increasing and if you look at predictions just from the oil sand development people themselves, they're estimating in the next 50 years they will increase 2.5 times or 150%. if you do back of the envelope calculation if nothing else changes very soon we'll be reaching levels that are qu
it to other people. be careful about your environment. bring purell with you restaurants. if you start to get the symptoms, stay home. >> that's a big part of it, isn't it? >> we were doing this report how it's $10 billion will be lost in people who call in sick because they have the flu, but what if people are coming into work who don't feel very well and suddenly just how easy is it to give it to somebody else? >> that's one of biggest problems, it's so contagious right now and the strains that are out there are so contagious and severe, that if you have symptoms and you go to work, there's a very good likelihood you'll give it to other people. and it doesn't feel good when you give it to friends and family. if you are sick, don't go to work and don't go to school. stay home, drink a lot of soup and tea and catch up on dvr. >> because of the severity of the situation, i was shocked to hear this, the archdiocese of boston and they feel they have a health emergency is telling priests they can suspend distribution of communion and alter sign of peace. and the shocking fact, the average desk is
dangerous environment. >> reporter: so far searchers have come up empty, but they hope he's stuck in a tree or lost and waiting to be found. clayton sandell, abc news, denver. >> clayton, thanks to you tonight. >>> we'll move on to the biggest headline in sports right now. alabama and notre dame, the bcs championship. and the audience will be as giant as the game. "good morning america's" josh elliott is there. ♪ >> reporter: it's the super bowl of college games, a national championship arguably as anticipated as any in the sport's history. >> to be the best, you've got to beat the best. >> reporter: number two alabama playing for their second straight national title and what would be its third in four years. and so a dynasty in the making. >> to win another one, oh, man, it speaks highly of our program and what we do around here. >> reporter: standing in their way? a resurgent and unbeaten notre dame, looking for its first national title in a quarter century. >> it would be a good time for us to win this championship. >> reporter: the fighting irish stand on history's doorstep thanks in
that come with that. the stewardship of the environment. we have enormous interest of course in our own resources, our people. in fact, 40% of canada's landmass is above the 60th parallel, yet we all have roughly 100,000 of our 34 million people living there. so it is an enormous challenge, obligation, even to continue to exert the sovereignty, search and rescue. at this time of year is becoming dark 24 hours a day. you have temperatures to plummet below 50 degrees celsius. and you have opening waters and changes that are going to create a lot of challenges because more people simply are going to go there, and more countries have exerted or expressed an interest. you mentioned china. there are many others that want to be part of this council. to your question about the obligation, i think it comes back to people playing by the rules and respecting the fact that there are places when disputes arise, as is the case with canada and the united states impact on the bering sea. some of the bordering areas of the arctic. i think there is a recognition that countries that adhere to a rule of a
environment as increased use of natural gas has reduced co2 emissions in the united states to 1992 levels. since 1990, the industry has invested more than $252 billion in improving environmental performance of our product, our facilities, and operations. between 2000, and 2010 the amount of investment and technology to reduce greenhouse gases was $71 billion. compare that to the $43 billion spent by the federal government over that same time. compared to all other industries combined which were just slightly larger than our industry invest the. refinery invested have invested more than $127 billion since 1990 to produce cleaner fuels and meet the growing of variety of state and federal mandates. the complete transition to tier two gasoline is estimated to have resulted in the reduction of tail pipe emissions by cars and light duty strucks, the -- trucks, the equivalent of taking 164 million cars off the road. through increased efficiency, we are doing more with less. america uses about half as much energy today to produce a dollar of gdp than it did in 1970. america's oil and natural gas
you would look at the material? >> we are all products of our experience, of our environment where we come from. i have been tempered by that experience about war. what war means, the consequences, who has to fight it. all of that experience is part of me and how i look at policy, how i look at our foreign policy, how i look at our military policy, how i judge consequences, how the world sees us, their trust in our purpose, in our power. no question that much of the questioning i've done about iraq even before we went in was conditioned tempered by that experience in vietnam. and whatever i will do in my life, whether it's in politics or outside, those experiences shape me just like anyone who has gone through war, those experiences shape you very much. one of the things it does is it makes you less inclined i suspect to jump into war. it's easy to get into war, not very easy to get out as evidenced by the johnson tapes. and you need to think through these things. diplomacy is critically important especially in the world we flive today. i think something else is important here and cer
contracts, for fostering a lot of the corruption in the country. so this is the environment in which president obama and president karzai will be meeting, trying to hammer out some agreement. on the other hand, president karzai would probably be well served by a larger u.s. presence in afghanistan because the more u.s. troops you have there, the more afghan soldiers they're going to train, the better equipped the afghan force is going to be. so again, this is going to be a really tough set of negotiations to see where that number falls. i can tell you, just in the last day or a couple days, i'm hearing more and more that that 6,000 figure is way more likely than that 10,000 figure. >> i suppose either way, numbers of troops is one thing, amounts of money is another. afghan military we've helped bill up cost way more than the afghan government is able to afford, it's billions of dollars still have to go in. >> reporter: yeah. they're owing to have downsize the military. they were building up the afghan military to sort of push back the taliban. but it was always clear that at some poi
a clunker for the environment. they say the program produced tons of unnecessary waste while doing little to curb greenhouse gas emissions. the emphasis was on car shredding and not recycling even though they say cars are almost completely recyclable. if they had recycled just metal and plastic it would have saved 24 million barrels of oil. department of transportation deemed cash for clung ears success. >> welfare recipients are taking out cash at new york strip clubs liquor stores and x-rated shops and presumably spending it there. they looked at 200 million or ebt records. the food stamp programs bans purchase of booze and lottery tickets with ebt card but cash assistance and is intended to spent on housing and utilities and household necessities can be obtained at atms. a senior fellow says, quote. i don't blame riptsd, if you are poor, its crummy life and you wanted to have a drink or see a naked woman. i blame the people who are in charge of this. >> a massachusetts democratic governor is downplaying the news his state cannot locate 19,000 people who have either been receiving welfa
problem or not. they get very upset because they don't. they have been destroyed by our food environment. i think these studies will come together and show that we have a couple addictive things, just like cigarettes. which sounded crazy a long time ago that people would say junk food would be linked, parallel to the tobacco court rulings. but, you know what, we're going to get there. i'm sure of it. >> well, you know, be prepared to hear from the corn refiners association. >> soda pop industry, come at me, too. tell me you're not selling complete poison. some nutritional value in pepsi. something in orange soda adds value to our diets and our body. don't look at me. what's wrong with you? >> let's all go out after the show and have some twizlers and talk this through. >> these are the things we have been eating for decades and drinking for decades and then we have an obesity crisis and we can't make the link? >> it's very possible the science will take us there. we do know where the science is for sure which is a diet on whole fresh fruits and vegetables primarily with small amounts of
environment. the nature of our debate of cyber has been the digital pearl harbor. the greater national security threat is the gradual loss of intellectual property. it is effort by a thousand cuts. part of the challenge at 35 is not just scaling costs but the leakage through cyber theft, which does not mean someone else can build it but they are gaining knowledge and capacity in a way they would not have been able to. something that may have given you a ten-year advantage does not give you that kind of advantage at technological capacity. >> i would like to tie it back to our economy and jobs. president obama said the focus would be to increase jobs. i come back to paul. you said that the success of our [indiscernible]channel some of the budget from the dod to the state department. i take this time to say that hillary clinton is coming back to work today. i wish her great recovery. if we have projected our intent is to china and the world. looking at the way china has been aggressive many ways in the south china sea. [indiscernible]how do we look into that without freedom of navigation
: what do we do to create the sort of environment now that promotes compromise? is it just something that happens when a nation is created, not when a nation is continued? >> guest: i think there have been a lot of times in our history, i think the constitution is a good dish call it in the book an engine of compromise. it propels us towards compromise, and one way is by making it easy to shut the whole thing down. it takes very little to bring government to a grinding halt. a couple of people in congress can do it. a president can do it. a few people on the supreme court can do it. it's much easier to keep things from happening than to make things happen, and what drives compromise is the need to do something. the need to move fur. i think that we have -- we always going to have a lot of political theater, and i love that. political -- i was an english major with a background in theater, and so i love the theatrical element of our politics. i think it's fascinating. i think it's dramatic, comic, tragic, a wonderful bit of literature. >> host: in the end, the founding generation had
. >> do you think there is a way we can do corporate reform in this environment? >> is extremely difficult but i think one really positive thing that came out of this fiscal debates this time is that for the first time in a long time, the business community unified around a concept of getting our deficit under control. they were not as worried about their individual tax breaks that might go as a result of having some reform. i hope that mood continues. that was a one group does not argue over one other or about accelerated depreciation and so forth. i am more hopeful that a more unified view from the business community is possible this time. >> i want to say one thing -- i'm not fully knowledgeable about this. i was at a meeting earlier today we're in noted tax expert said you cannot do corporate reform and not to individual reform because when we change the parameters, a whole lot of entities shifted from c corporations to other forms that were taxed on the individual side. if you lower rates on the corporate tax and get away with some of the preferences for oil and gas and various things
the crop insurance program. jenna: last question. we talk about the environment we talk about the fiscal environment, and that is very much reality for you as the secretary of agriculture. where do you see the opportunity to cut, when you look at your own budget in the fiscal environment in the year ahead where are you looking potentially for the savings of american people. >> we reduced our budget by 12 1/2%. our workforce is down by 6,000 folks. we're restructuring, closing offices and being more efficient but there is also the opportunity within the farm programs. that is one of the missed opportunities not getting the farm bill passed because there were reforms in what the senate passed and what the house ag committee passed would have provide somewhere between 23 and $34 billion worth of savings. hopefully we rest sure rec reforms as we continue the debate this year. jenna: nice to have you on the program. really appreciate your time today. >> thank you. jon: now this fox news alert. testimony just wrapped up in a colorado courtroom revealing some chilling new details about the movi
attacks, the united states is susceptible to that environment. it's not only here in the united states but u.s. interests around the world. and that's why the u.s. has to maintain or believes it has to maintain that presence there. there's no doubt that going forward many of these issues are going to come to the surface. afghanistan could find itself in a very bloody civil war. iraq after the u.s. withdrawal has not gotten necessarily better. there's still violence. there are still attacks. but to some extent u.s. interests are a little more secured as a result of what happened there in the eyes of, you know, the united states officials that pursued that war. so again, you could make the argument that in afghanistan something similar could happen. but there's no doubt a great deal of uncertainty, great deal of questions remain. as to whether or not the central government in afghanistan can actually control the military and preserve the security, integrity of that country. and that remains to be seen. >> if only we could predict the future. all right, ayman, good to see you. >> thanks a
well in the current environment. you can't survive in this industry unless you continue to cut costs. we've got a great track record, frankly, over the last five years of delivering, you know, circa 100 million pounds of cost savings year on year. we intend to do that going forward. >> and joining us with more, founder and managing director at neeve capital. thanks for joining us. how tough is if for the gross? tough for morrison's. we get tesco tomorrow. >> i think it is tough and goes beyond the economy. i think what's happened is to some extent people are prioritizing spending on other things over food. you've seen so much food inflation the last two, three years that people almost prefer to spend it on treat like apple, for example, or clothing. what that actually has meant is people are discovering or rediscovering that it's cool enough to shop, and people have discovered you can get good quality stuff at really much cheaper prices. and i think in other terms, what people are doing is they're shopping on convenience. they want to go? where closer to them. they don't actually lik
? thank you. >> the interment of the -- environment of the narcotrafficker forces in uncertainty. when they raise an orchard or vineyard and turns it into a poppy field -- when he is not sure what is learned happened to him or his family, they turn to narcotics. it takes three months to grow it. it does not need refrigeration or economic integration, nothing. if we see an increased degree of uncertainty, we would probably see more poppy cultivation. it would be listed economic activities. -- illicit economic activities. the leaderships and international community. in the areas where the economy is thriving, we have seen a reduction of narcotics and cultivation of the poppy. in areas where we see most of the fighting, that is where most of the poppies are grown. >> let me close with a final question. jim used a number of statistics. one that struck me is i have the right to a 52% of the afghan population thought the country is going on in the right direction. my question to each of you, what is your view? is the country going in the right direction and are you optimistic or pessimistic
a proper environment in which to do their jobs and that will include making sure that don't ask, don't tell and elimination of don't ask, don't tell is fully implemented. >> with regard to the military budget, he has called the military a bloated organization. chairman of the joint chiefs, martin dempsey, said this week that we are on the brink of creating a hollow force. would a secretary of defense hagel pro-provide over the hollowing out of the defense department? >> the biggest concern with respect to who will league out is this sequester that's hanging like a sword over the department. that's what they had tried -- have to not let that happen but with respect to going in and finding things within the department of defense that perhaps you don't need or you can eliminate, if that's what you mean by bloat, i hope he does find bloat and gets rid of it. >> agree with his characterization that it's bloated? >> bloated doesn't necessarily mean the whole department is bloated. bloated mean there is are probably things in the department that you can take a hard look at and determine whether or
. there are changes in votes year to year and the environment changes, the discussion goes further. i think there will be some developments over the next few years in regards to these two guys and sosa included but is it enough to bump them up another 40% wii is what they need 0 get into the hall. >> i'm curious in the last 30-seconds, you said the writers look at other cry i can't, the brirs and the strikeouts and those are things like character. is that something well defined in baseball and in sports? >> well, you know, that rule was written a long time ago. so ty cobb who is a notorious womanizer is easily in the hall of fame. what defines character has evolved over time. this has defined the discussion and other areas and hall of fame don't have that in their procedure. >> barry sverluga thank you very much. >> thank you for having me. >> ifill: again, the major developments of the day: a major new study found one in eight american teenagers has had suicidal thoughts and one of every 25 has attempted suicide. there was word that president obama will nominate his chief of staff, jack le
and suburban environments particularly. because what we're looking at in montana is not quite the same as what we may be looking at in chicago or places around the nation. >> cynthia -- >> what do people need them for in montana? what do people need them for in montana? i grew up in alabama, in deepest, reddest alabama. my father loved hunting. i grew up with shotguns and rifles in the house. he never -- it was a rural area. he never felt the need to have an assault weapon. the deer weren't armed. so why do you need an assault weapon? i don't understand -- [ overlapping speakers ] >> i did not say assault weapon. >> why do you need one? >> i did not say an assault weapon. what i'm saying is when you're putting a solution in place we're still going to have to be mindful or the compliancy in chicago and new york city versus people in the big west. people such as residents in montana or the dakotas. we're going to have to be mindful. i'm not saying i'm defending people having assault weapons. those are weapons of war and they too often get in the hands of people that hurt folks throughout america
extent. the uncertainty of it all fascinated me, as does my environment, just by nature. so the book ends up being very much about our landscape, how we perceive it as fascinating in our youth, and how over time, it changes. the same substance, stone, rock, water, wood, guess from being the unknown, worthy of curiosity, to at some point being a threat, and the natural defiance of us living our lives, which is in defiance of our mortality, all the way. from childhood lower, immortal, to our elder years, where we become the archive, where we become the thing which holds so many people we have lost and is what survives. memory is what survives, and within that memory, the afterlife of so much. so, thank you. [applause] >> good afternoon. i'd also like to thank the organizers of the miami book fair for having me. when i started writing my book a year or two ago i certainly did not expect i would end up here, or seated on a panel with these gentlemen. i think everything we have heard so far is a lot of war stories represent a need to explain. why was there an outpost where there should never h
and one is to mr. dove -- when no one of your main arguments is that it's a good environment for negotiations of a similar situation, describing 2004. now, i want to know in light of all the -- that we have heard the government perceived by the taliban and the u.s. is pulling for the americans why would you say that the americans -- to talabani's in a situation -- [inaudible] could you please elaborate more and the other question is that in passing i heard something about india and iran. i would like to hear some more on that to see whether iran and india together or individually have any role in the play as you'll discuss. thank you very much. >> hi, katie from the department of state. you kind of reference the growth of ttp to the lack of support received by the pakistani civilian law-enforcement bodies. i wanted to see if you could kindly clarify whether the support you are looking for there was financial or domestic, political will and why do you think that support is provided to you? >> the gentleman behind. >> hi. i'm with the u.s. -- religious freedom. the role of reli
. [applause] we are getting an environment where business can grow, an environment that has been created by all of you and especially the leadership of governor cuomo. [applause] leadership that has companies like mine following a path to new york. tid pleasure of meeting the governor last month and it is my pleasure and honor to introduce him to you now, the governor of the state of new york, andrew comb month -- cuomo. >> [applause] >> thank you, thank you very much. thank you very much. happy new year new york. first, let me acknowledge and thank the greatest partner a governor could ever had lieutenant governor bob duffy who has been magnificent in the work he had done for this state. the question can one person make a difference in life. bob duffy has made a tremendous difference aross this state and we oh him gratitude. let's give him another round of applause. [applause] to the elected and legislative leaders who have been introduced once before, it's a pleasure to be with you. attorney general, thank you for being here. co-leaders senators, pleasure to be with you, assembly speak
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